Vincent Crespi

Vin Crespi is professor of physics and materials science and engineering at Pennsylvania State University. He received his Ph.D. in physics at the University of California, Berkeley, and joined the faculty at Penn State in 1997. Vin is currently the associate director of the Penn State Materials Research Science and Engineering Center. His research covers a broad range of condensed matter theory, from simple analytical models to large-scale computation, whatever is the best tool for the job at hand, although he has not yet found an appropriate physical application for interpretive dance. Topics of research include carbon nanostructures, photonic materials, superconductivity, surface science, semiconductor alloys, magnetic frustration, molecular and catalytic motors, phyllotaxis and self-assembly. Vin is also active in public outreach and has contributed to the development of several cart-based museum shows on materials. His name appears on a blackboard in the movie Fat Man and Little Boy, if you know where to look.

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Vincent Crespi Published August 25, 2008

Mesoscopics | Graphene

Graphene has been idealized as a two-dimensional electron system in which the electrons behave like massless fermions, but how “perfect” is it? Scientists now show they can prepare free-standing sheets of graphene that have some of the highest electron mobilities of any inorganic semiconductor.