Notes from the Editors: What do you think?

Physics 3, 89
Help improve Physics by filling out a short survey.

Two years ago, the American Physical Society launched Physics, a publication devoted to expert commentary and explanation of some of the best research published in the APS journals. Since then, the website has amassed a healthy archive of articles in all fields of physics. Word-of-mouth reaction and anecdotal feedback have been strongly positive—physicists appreciate the guided tours through a selection of exceptional research each week in Physics. Judging from the number of email alert and RSS subscribers, many of you are reading Physics regularly.

As gratifying as this is for the Editors, it is time for a more objective assessment and we need your help. Are you reading only in your field, or do you find the articles and highlights in other fields useful and interesting? Is the level of discussion right, too elementary, or too technical? Are we selecting the right papers? Are there areas of physics we should cover more (or less) or new features on the website you would like to see?

These questions and more are posed in an online survey that shouldn't take much time to fill out. The results will be invaluable as we seek to calibrate our editing and improve our selection of papers. Please take a few moments to complete the questionnaire and help improve Physics.

– The Editors


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