Bruce Winstein

Bruce Winstein is the Samuel K. Allison Professor of Physics at The University of Chicago where he has been since 1972. For the bulk of his career he was a particle experimenter doing most of his work at Fermilab. While maintaining an interest in fundamental physics, he joined the field of observational cosmology about a decade ago. In 2001 he founded the NSF Physics Frontier Center for Cosmological Physics (now KICP). Currently he is the U.S. PI on the QUIET experiment measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1995, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2007, and he shared the 2007 APS Panofsky Prize for his work studying CP violation in neutral kaons at Fermilab.

Bruce Winstein, Kathryn M. Zurek Published May 4, 2009

Particles and Fields | Astrophysics | Cosmology

New results from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, the most precise to date in the energy range 20GeV to 1TeV, should help resolve whether cosmic rays composed of the lightest charged particles, i.e., electrons and positrons, come from dark matter or some other astrophysical source.