Lucio Frydman

Frydman earned a Ph.D. in physical chemistry (1990) from the University of Buenos Aires. In 1992, after a postdoc at the University of California, Berkeley, he became professor in the Department of Chemistry of the University of Illinois in Chicago. In 2001, he moved to Israel to become professor at the Weizmann Institute, where he currently works in the Department of Chemical Physics. In 2012, Frydman became the director of the Helen L. and Martin S. Kimmel Institute for Magnetic Resonance, and chief scientist in chemistry and biology at the U.S. National High Magnetic Field Lab. Frydman’s research focuses on magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging in solids, liquids, and under in vivo conditions.

Lucio Frydman Published February 18, 2014

Magnetism | Chemical Physics

Long-lived singlet states—zero-spin states made of two spin-1/2 particles—can be created by combining two different atomic species such as carbon and hydrogen.